Executive Summary
You are reading the Chinese version of this essay. At present, no English version is available.
You are reading the Chinese version of this essay. There also exists an English version.
Sino Americans of the second generation (along with related populations such as Sino Canadians) have had their lives dragged down, and are, in many cases, permanently damaged, owing to the unnatural challenges and offenses which have plagued their childhoods, not to mention their careers. As the generation of youngsters matured and began to express themselves with greater articulation, some facts of the matter became increasingly evident, despite attempts by parents and by the wider American public at concealment:
  • A disturbingly large proportion of second-generation Sino Americans claim to have been raised under abusive and exceedingly violent parents. Their allegations can no longer be dismissed as the transient complaints of teenagers, since their interactions with their parents have remained in turmoil well into adulthood.
  • A disturbingly large proportion of second-generation, male Sino Americans suffer from lifelong difficulties in making friends, in dealing with colleagues, and in transacting with members of the general public, leading to lifelong sadness and feelings of alienation.
  • A disturbingly large proportion of second-generation, female Sino Americans have felt compelled to refuse to date or marry their male counterparts and to seek white men exclusively, which has given rise to certain noticeable demographic imbalances.
  • A disturbingly large proportion of white Americans do not consider Sino Americans as being "Americans." In particular, they do not consider an American passport, an American education, or fluency in the English language as bestowing the American identity, or membership in American culture. Outside of the State of Hawaii — a notable exception — Sino Americans spend their entire lives contending with the stigma of being Perpetual Foreigners. Even in the State of California, famed for its large number of Sino American residents, members of the demographic are encouraged to self-segregate and not to regard themselves as "Americans" in the general sense.
Stemming from these foundational troubles are a complex array of challenges and offenses encompassing nearly every aspect of the Sino American's life. For many, the troubles began at an early date, and abruptly — as the American society, generally speaking, does not provide young children with a grace-period whereby they may learn their subjects, receive guidance in societal customs, and practice their conversational and letter-writing skills absent of the involvement of racial politics. Instead, schools teach young Sino American children at the outset to view themselves differently, to accept that their social skills and creativity are inferior, and to avoid fitting in with Americans at large — under the guise of so-called Multiculturalism — which is really a euphemism for the propaganda that "different races think differently." Feeling confused and alienated, these young students have nearly no mentors in their proximity who can soundly advise them without giving way to vested indifferences, or worse, deeply engrained misconceptions. It is not surprising that, in the face of such iniquities and disparities, broken lives well into adulthood have become the median rather than the outlier.
Even if a given Sino American has not been personally afflicted by these issues, the ubiquity of their occurrence within the American experience — according to unvarying reports from Sino Americans, no matter in which corner of America they grew up — should be simply alarming. It is also relevant to note that, over the last ten years, the fairly large communities of foreign students hailing from the PRC, who arrived in America for their tertiary educations, have widely observed Sino Americans to be unhealthy, tired, and severely lacking in self-esteem. The tribulations endured by Sino Americans are approaching the status of common knowledge among the PRC public — even as the first-generation members of the demographic continue to contest the problem's existence, and to cast aside the evidence.
This website is neither the first nor the last addressing the subject of the Sino American experience, but it represents an honest investigation into the option of Sino Americans to be employed in the PRC, to marry citizens of the PRC, and to settle within that country. As children of East Asian immigrants who were not able to live normal lives owing to the undercurrents of hostility within America, we have turned to repatriation as a means of achieving a safer, more secure, and more ethical lifestyle, and we are willing to assist others of our demographic who are interested. If our target-audience potentially includes hundreds of thousands of people, then that is all the more regretful. I sincerely wish, in any case, that the other demographics of America can respect our choice and not be sour-faced that we have taken to questioning the existence of the so-called "American Dream." This website also serves as the online community for Sino Americans (Canadians, Australians, and so forth) already employed, settled, or frequently involved in dealings with the PRC, who are inclined to assist one another in adjusting to the post-transitional lifestyle.
With these complex tasks being undertaken at the fringes of these two major countries, and during these changing times — and upon the vast preexisting qualifications of the Sino American populace, which to a large extent have been uncredited, but which might someday be utilized in the service of their ethnic homeland — it would not be remiss to suppose that the conclusion of the Sino American experience might, by our grandchildren's estimations, by considered one of the more noteworthy reunions of the 21st century. It is our hope that if we succeed in our task with diligence, they will remember our story even in the century to come. May God assist us in striving to be worthy of our progeny.
© 2018–2022, Sino American Reunion
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Executive Summary
Sino Americans of the second generation (along with related populations such as Sino Canadians) have had their lives dragged down, and are, in many cases, permanently damaged, owing to the unnatural challenges and offenses which have plagued their childhoods, not to mention their careers. As the generation of youngsters matured and began to express themselves with greater articulation, some facts of the matter became increasingly evident, despite attempts by parents and by the wider American public at concealment:
Stemming from these foundational troubles are a complex array of challenges and offenses encompassing nearly every aspect of the Sino American's life. For many, the troubles began at an early date, and abruptly — as the American society, generally speaking, does not provide young children with a grace-period whereby they may learn their subjects, receive guidance in societal customs, and practice their conversational and letter-writing skills absent of the involvement of racial politics. Instead, schools teach young Sino American children at the outset to view themselves differently, to accept that their social skills and creativity are inferior, and to avoid fitting in with Americans at large — under the guise of so-called Multiculturalism — which is really a euphemism for the propaganda that "different races think differently." Feeling confused and alienated, these young students have nearly no mentors in their proximity who can soundly advise them without giving way to vested indifferences, or worse, deeply engrained misconceptions. It is not surprising that, in the face of such iniquities and disparities, broken lives well into adulthood have become the median rather than the outlier.
Even if a given Sino American has not been personally afflicted by these issues, the ubiquity of their occurrence within the American experience — according to unvarying reports from Sino Americans, no matter in which corner of America they grew up — should be simply alarming. It is also relevant to note that, over the last ten years, the fairly large communities of foreign students hailing from the PRC, who arrived in America for their tertiary educations, have widely observed Sino Americans to be unhealthy, tired, and severely lacking in self-esteem. The tribulations endured by Sino Americans are approaching the status of common knowledge among the PRC public — even as the first-generation members of the demographic continue to contest the problem's existence, and to cast aside the evidence.
This website is neither the first nor the last addressing the subject of the Sino American experience, but it represents an honest investigation into the option of Sino Americans to be employed in the PRC, to marry citizens of the PRC, and to settle within that country. As children of East Asian immigrants who were not able to live normal lives owing to the undercurrents of hostility within America, we have turned to repatriation as a means of achieving a safer, more secure, and more ethical lifestyle, and we are willing to assist others of our demographic who are interested. If our target-audience potentially includes hundreds of thousands of people, then that is all the more regretful. I sincerely wish, in any case, that the other demographics of America can respect our choice and not be sour-faced that we have taken to questioning the existence of the so-called "American Dream." This website also serves as the online community for Sino Americans (Canadians, Australians, and so forth) already employed, settled, or frequently involved in dealings with the PRC, who are inclined to assist one another in adjusting to the post-transitional lifestyle.
With these complex tasks being undertaken at the fringes of these two major countries, and during these changing times — and upon the vast preexisting qualifications of the Sino American populace, which to a large extent have been uncredited, but which might someday be utilized in the service of their ethnic homeland — it would not be remiss to suppose that the conclusion of the Sino American experience might, by our grandchildren's estimations, by considered one of the more noteworthy reunions of the 21st century. It is our hope that if we succeed in our task with diligence, they will remember our story even in the century to come. May God assist us in striving to be worthy of our progeny.
© 2018–2022, Sino American Reunion
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